Nigeria Medical Journal »

  • Gentamicin-mediated ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity: A clinical trial study

    Posted 2016-11-11 00:00:00 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Parviz Saleh, Shamsi Abbasalizadeh, Saman Rezaeian, Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad, Reza Piri, Hojjat Hossein PourfeiziNigerian Medical Journal 2016 57(6):347-352Background: Aminoglycosides and mainly gentamicin are the most important antimicrobial agents. Two different methods of administration exist: Single and multiple doses. There has always been a controversy about the less harmful administration method, to minimize adverse effects of gentamicin - deafness and renal insufficiency. In this study, it was aimed to compare two different methods of administration to figure out the least harmful treatment method. Materials and Methods: In a clinical study, eighty patients aged 12-55 years who were admitted with sepsis syndrome were included in the study; they were divided into two groups: The first group received single-dose treatment (5 mg/kg) whereas the second group was treated with multiple doses (1.7 mg/kg three times a day) of gentamicin. Results: The results show that blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (CR) levels were decreased in the first group. Both blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and also mean glomerular filtration rate was increased in the same group. In the second group, mean BUN and CR levels were increased while the GFR was decreased in the same group. There was also a gradual increase in GFR in the first group. GFR <80 was decreased from 20% to 5.1% in the first group while increased from 5% to 27.5% in the second group. Results of audiometric studies show 6.1% hearing problem in the first group and 12.8% in the second one. Conclusions: Results of the present study showed that nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity are minimized in single-dose administration compared to multiples ...

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  • Sociodemographic profiles and use-dynamics of Jadelle (levonorgestrel) implants in Jos, Nigeria

    Posted 2016-11-11 00:00:00 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    VC Pam, JT Mutihir, DD Nyango, I Shambe, CO Egbodo, JA KarshimaNigerian Medical Journal 2016 57(6):314-318Background: Contraceptive implants (including Jadelle) are highly effective, safe, and easy to use and have a long duration of action. They do not interfere with intercourse with immediate return to fertility after removal. However, disruption of the menstrual bleeding pattern is almost inevitable and coercive prescription may be a problem because insertion and removal of implants are provider dependent. The objective of this study was to determine the sociodemographic profiles of acceptors of Jadelle and the reasons for discontinuation in Jos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a 6-year retrospective chart review carried out at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Results: About 1401 women accepted Jadelle with a mean (&#897;standard deviation) of 33.4 &#897; 5.9 years. About 88% of the women were Christians and almost three-quarters (73.5%) had at least secondary school education. The means of parity and number of children still alive at the time of accepting Jadelle were 4.1 and 3.8, respectively. Half of the women (49.5%) were breastfeeding and over half (55.9%) had future fertility desires at the time of commencing Jadelle. About 82% had previously used other contraceptives (mostly short-acting methods such as injectables, pills, and condoms), with only 18% starting Jadelle as the first-ever contraceptive method. About 90% of the women had regular menstrual cycles. The major reason for discontinuation of Jadelle was desire for pregnancy although menstrual pattern disruption was the most common reason for removal in the first 6 months of use. Conclusion: The main reason for discontinuation of Jadelle was to have more children although menstrual pattern disruptions accounted for earlier ...

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  • Unintended pregnancy among antenatal women in a tertiary hospital in North Central Nigeria

    Posted 2016-11-11 00:00:00 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Teddy E Agida, Godwin O Akaba, Bissalla A Ekele, Francis AdebayoNigerian Medical Journal 2016 57(6):334-338Background: Unintended pregnancy is a pregnancy that is either unwanted or mistimed. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of unintended pregnancy as well as to document the determinant factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 300 women attending the antenatal clinic of the Teaching Hospital. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, desirability of the current pregnancy at the time of conception, and knowledge and practice of contraceptive methods were collected using a pretested questionnaire. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Chi-square test was used for tests of associations with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. Results: The average age of the respondents was 30.0 &#177; 4.7 years. Overall, 33.3% and 58.3% of the respondents attained secondary and tertiary levels of education, respectively. The prevalence rate of unintended pregnancy was 16%. Contraceptive awareness was quite high (259, 86.3%). However, contraceptive usage was low as 192 (61.9%) had never used any form of contraceptives. Univariate analysis using Chi-square test showed a statistically significant association between age and unwanted pregnancy (&#967;[2] = 68.56, P < 0.001), as well as between parity and unwanted pregnancy (&#967;[2] = 39.92, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of unintended pregnancy among women attending antenatal clinic is high, possibly due to low contraceptive usage. Adequate information, education, and communication materials should be provided during antenatal health talks. Advocacy visits for community sensitization should also be ...

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  • Obstetric predictors of hypertension: A cross-sectional study of women attending the postnatal clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital

    Posted 2016-11-11 00:00:00 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Hadiza A Agbo, Basil N Okeahialam, Patrick H DaruNigerian Medical Journal 2016 57(6):320-323Background: Hypertensive disease in pregnancy (HDP) accounts for high mother and child morbi-mortality and predict future cardiometabolic diseases. This study aimed to identify obstetric predictors of HDP needing preventive action to reduce its consequences; when women present to antenatal clinic (ANC). Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive this was an Interviewer-administered semi-structured questionnaire-based study of the anthropometric, and blood pressure measurementsin attendees at the postnatal clinic (PNC) of Jos University with ANC records. Setting: Six weeks postnatal clinic (PNC) of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Results: The following indices proved predictive of HDP and subsequent hypertension: weight (P = 0.009), hip circumference (P = 0.018), parity (P = 0.043), waist circumference (P = 0.00), abdominal height (P = 0.040), waist/height (P = 0.020), history of developing hypertension in previous pregnancy (P = 0.000), birth weight of baby (P = 0.02), and mode of delivery (P = 0.05). Conclusion: To initiate preventive action on ANC registration in mitigating effects of or outrightly preventing HDP, careful check on anthropometry as well as history of hypertension or operative/preterm delivery in a previous pregnancy is ...

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  • Dietary practices and nutritional status of under-five children in rural and urban communities of Lagos State, Nigeria

    Posted 2016-11-11 00:00:00 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Idowu O Senbanjo, Ibiyemi O Olayiwola, Wasiu A. O. AfolabiNigerian Medical Journal 2016 57(6):307-313Background: Evidence shows that urban children generally have a better nutritional status than their rural counterparts. However, data establishing whether this difference in prevalence of undernutrition could be ascribed to difference in dietary practices are few. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare dietary practices and nutritional status of children in rural and urban communities of Lagos State, Nigeria. Methods: This was a comparative-analytical study conducted using the multistage sampling technique to select the study cases. A total of 300 mother-child pairs were studied, including 150 each from rural and urban communities. Data collected include demographics, socioeconomic characteristics, feeding practices and anthropometric measurements of the participants. Food intake data were collected using 24-h dietary recall. Malnutrition in children was determined by calculating the prevalence of low height-for-age (stunting), low weight-for-age (underweight), and low weight-for-height (wasting) using the World Health Organization cutoff points. Results: The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months (25.3% vs. 28.7%; P = 0.516), use of formula feeds (48.7% vs. 44%; P = 0.077), and mean age of child at introduction of semisolid foods (7.54 &#177; 4.0 months vs. 8.51 &#177; 7.3 months; P = 0.117) were not significantly different between urban and rural communities. The diversity of food choices and frequencies of consumption were similar between urban and rural communities. However, prevalence levels of underweight and stunted children were significantly higher in rural than that of urban communities (19.4% vs. 9.3%, P < 0.001 and 43.3% vs. 12.6%, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Other risk factors besides inappropriate feeding practices need to be considered for ...

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