Psychiatry »

  • The partial dopamine D2 receptor agonist aripiprazole is associated with weight gain in adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Posted 2017-03-25 16:59:39 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Related Articles The partial dopamine D2 receptor agonist aripiprazole is associated with weight gain in adolescent anorexia nervosa. Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Mar 23;: Authors: Frank GK, Shott ME, Hagman JO, Schiel MA, DeGuzman MC, Rossi B Abstract OBJECTIVE: Finding medication to support treatment of anorexia nervosa has been difficult. Neuroscience-based approaches may help in this effort. Recent brain imaging studies in adults and adolescents with anorexia nervosa suggest that dopamine-related reward circuits are hypersensitive and could provide a treatment target. METHODS: Here, we present a retrospective chart review of 106 adolescents with anorexia nervosa some of whom were treated with the dopamine D2 receptor partial agonist aripiprazole during treatment in a specialized eating disorder program. RESULTS: The results show that aripiprazole treatment was associated with greater increase in body mass index (BMI) during treatment. DISCUSSION: The use of dopamine receptor agonists may support treatment success in anorexia nervosa and should be further investigated. PMID: 28334444 [PubMed - as supplied by ...

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  • Fear of Vomiting and Low Body Weight in Two Pediatric Patients: Diagnostic Challenges.

    Posted 2017-03-25 16:59:39 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Related Articles Fear of Vomiting and Low Body Weight in Two Pediatric Patients: Diagnostic Challenges. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017;26(1):59-61 Authors: Maertens C, Couturier J, Grant C, Johnson N Abstract Fear of vomiting can be a symptom associated with several disorders, including Eating Disorders (ED), Specific Phobia (Emetophobia), Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), making proper diagnosis challenging. At this time the literature exploring this symptom is limited, and to our knowledge very few cases have been described in the child and adolescent population. We report here the cases of one child and one adolescent presenting with significant weight loss, food restriction and fear of vomiting. The child's fear of vomiting masked a concurrent desire to achieve fitness and weight loss, which was uncovered following weight restoration. The adolescent patient, although significantly underweight and food avoidant, also expressed no concerns with body image, until weight restored. The history, course in hospital and management of these patients is discussed, along with several challenges that complicated the diagnosis. PMID: 28331505 [PubMed - in ...

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  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and disordered eating behaviour: A systematic review and a framework for future research.

    Posted 2017-03-25 16:59:39 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Related Articles Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and disordered eating behaviour: A systematic review and a framework for future research. Clin Psychol Rev. 2017 Mar 06;53:109-121 Authors: Kaisari P, Dourish CT, Higgs S Abstract Preliminary findings suggest that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may be associated with disordered eating behaviour, but whether there is sufficient evidence to suggest an association between ADHD and specific types of disordered eating behaviour is unclear. Furthermore, it is uncertain whether specific features associated with ADHD are differentially associated with disordered eating behaviour. A systematic review of seventy-five studies was conducted to evaluate the potential association between ADHD symptomatology and disordered eating behaviour and to provide an estimate of the strength of evidence for any association. Overall, a moderate strength of evidence exists for a positive association between ADHD and disordered eating and with specific types of disordered-eating behaviour, in particular, overeating behaviour. There is consistent evidence that impulsivity symptoms of ADHD are positively associated with overeating and bulimia nervosa and more limited evidence for an association between hyperactivity symptoms and restrictive eating in males but not females. Further research is required to assess the potential direction of the relationship between ADHD and disordered eating, the underlying mechanisms and the role of specific ADHD symptoms in the development and/or maintenance of disordered eating behaviour. We propose a framework that could be used to guide the design of future studies. PMID: 28334570 [PubMed - as supplied by ...

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  • The relationship between eating psychopathology and obstructive sleep apnea in bariatric surgery candidates: A retrospective study.

    Posted 2017-03-25 16:59:39 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Related Articles The relationship between eating psychopathology and obstructive sleep apnea in bariatric surgery candidates: A retrospective study. Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Mar 23;: Authors: Sockalingam S, Tehrani H, Taube-Schiff M, Van Exan J, Santiago V, Hawa R Abstract OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), eating psychopathology, and major depressive disorder (MDD) are highly prevalent in patients with severe obesity. Our study aimed to identify differences in binge-eating disorder (BED) prevalence in bariatric surgery candidates with and without OSA. METHODS: In this retrospective study, demographic data, psychiatric diagnoses, OSA diagnosis, binge eating, depressive and quality of life (QOL) symptoms were collected from 1,099 bariatric surgery candidates from a Canadian setting. Analysis of variance was used to identify differences in psychopathology and QOL between groups with OSA and BED, BED alone, OSA alone or neither BED or OSA. RESULTS: Study participants' mean body mass index was 49.3 kg/m(2) and 52.6% had a diagnosis of OSA. Patients with OSA were significantly more likely to have a diagnosis of past BED (χ(2)  = 6.848, p = .009) and current MDD (χ(2)  = 5.165, p = .023). Binge-eating (p < .001) and depressive symptoms (p < .001) were significantly higher in patients with co-morbid BED and OSA compared to patients with OSA alone or patients with no diagnosis of BED or OSA. Patients with co-morbid BED and OSA only had significantly lower physical (p < .001) and mental QOL (p = .007) compared to patients with no diagnosis of BED or OSA. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest that patients with a history of BED should be reassessed for OSA. Research is needed to examine whether BED may predispose individuals to developing obesity and OSA. PMID: 28334442 [PubMed - as supplied by ...

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  • Feedback in Group Psychotherapy for Eating disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Posted 2017-03-25 16:59:39 dun: Mahammad A. Tafida

    Related Articles Feedback in Group Psychotherapy for Eating disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2017 Mar 23;: Authors: Davidsen AH, Poulsen S, Lindschou J, Winkel P, Tróndarson MF, Waaddegaard M, Lau M Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of client feedback in group psychotherapy on attendance and treatment outcome for patients with eating disorders. METHOD: We conducted a randomized clinical trial with central randomization stratified for diagnosis and treatment type according to a computer-generated allocation sequence concealed to the investigators. One-hundred and 59 adult participants, diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified according to DSM-IV, were included. Eighty participants were allocated to the experimental group, and 79 participants to the control group. Both groups received 20-25 weekly group psychotherapy sessions. In the experimental group, participants gave and received feedback about therapy progress and alliance, measured before and after each session using the Outcome Rating Scale and the Group Session Rating Scale. The primary outcome was rate of attendance to treatment sessions; the secondary outcome was severity of eating disorder symptoms measured with the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Exploratory outcomes were psychological distress measured with the Symptom Checklist-90-R and the Outcome Rating Scale, social functioning measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale, and episodes of self-harm and suicide measured with a modified version of the Self-Harm Inventory. RESULTS: Feedback compared with control did not affect the rate of attendance (0.59 vs. 0.58; p = .96), the severity of symptoms (2.03 vs. 2.02; p = .46), or any of the exploratory outcomes (p values from 0.06 to 0.67). CONCLUSIONS: Feedback neither increased attendance nor improved outcomes for ...

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